Fast-Track for Trauma

Instructor led Trauma Course for Cardiac Emergencies

CODE TRAUMA - Cardiac Emergencies

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20 CE:
$38
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Course Objectives

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter I – Introduction
The Cardiovascular System, Capillary Walls, Perfusion, Cardiac Compromise, Aspirin and Nitroglycerin Administration
Chapter II – Full Review of the Circulatory System

Heart Chambers, Heart Valves, Coronary Arteries, Cardiac Output, Cardiac Compromise.
Chapter III – Abnormalities of the Cardiovascular System

Atherosclerosis, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Angina Pectoris, Acute Myocardial Infarction, Classic Angina, Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Failure, Right ventricular Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Aortic Aneurysm. Nontraumatic Tamponade, Hypertensive Emergencies, Cardiac Shock, Arterial Occlusion, Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances, Myocarditis, Endocarditis, Pericarditis.
Chapter IV – Oxygen Administration

The danger of too much oxygen. What are free radicals?
Chapter V – Mastering the Head to Toe Assessment with the OPQRST tool

O for onset, P for provocation, Q for quality, R for radiation, S for severity, T for time.
Case Scenarios
Cardiovascular Emergency Examination
Matching Words with Definition Practice

Upon the completion of this course, Cardiovascular Emergencies, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe chest pain or discomfort and how it relates to heart disease and cardiac arrest.
  • Describe the structure and function of the circulatory system including:
  • The cardiac conduction system
  • The conductivity, contractility and automaticity of the myocardial tissues.
  • Effects of the autonomic nervous system on the heart
  • Gross anatomy of the heart
  • Systemic and pulmonary circulation
  • Coronary arteries
  • Plasma and formed elements of the blood
  • Explain the relationship between electrical and mechanical events in the heart.
  • Describe the process of depolarization and repolarization, and relate the waves and
    the intervals of a normal electrocardiogram to the physiological events they
    represent.
  • Discuss the relationship between hypoxia, damage to the cardiac conduction system, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation.
  • Describe the roles of the heart and blood vessels in maintaining normal blood pressure.
  • Explain the importance of early recognition of signs and symptoms and the early
    treatment of patients with cardiac emergencies.
  • Explain the pathophysiology and the appropriate assessment and management of the following conditions that may be classified as a cardiac compromise or acute coronary syndrome:

– Angina pectoris
– Myocardial infarction
– Aortic aneurysm or dissection
– Congestive heart failure
– Cardiogenic shock
– Hypertensive emergencies
– Cardiac arrest
– Nontraumatic Cardiac Tamponade
– Arteriole Occlusion
– Cardiac dysrhythmic
– Myocarditis
– Endocarditis
– Pericarditis

  • Explain the typical presentation of a myocardial ischemia or infarction in females.
  • Explain the indications, contraindications, forms, dosage, administration, actions, 3 side effects, and reassessment for nitroglycerin.
  • Explain the special considerations in assessing and managing pediatric and geriatric patients with cardiac emergencies.
  • Explain the assessment – based approach to assessment and emergency medical care for cardiac compromise and acute coronary syndrome.
  • Discuss the indications and contraindications for percutaneous intervention (angioplasty) or fibrinolytic therapy in patients with cardiac emergencies.
  • Given a series of scenarios, demonstrate the assessment based management of a variety of patients with cardiovascular emergencies, including:
  • Explain the indications for aspirin.
  • Explain the contraindications for aspirin.
    – The forms of aspirin.
    – The dosage of aspirin.
    – Administration of aspirin.
    – Actions of aspirin.
    – Side effects of aspirin.
    – Reassessment of aspirin.

This course is for the EMS and Emergency Department Nurse who wants to obtain a full review of the circulatory system.

  • You will understand the fundamental causes for abnormalities in the cardiovascular system.
  • You will also learn how to master the head to toe assessment for critical patients.
  • You will practice with case scenarios appropriate for EMTs, Paramedics, and Nurses in transport.

The patient in a critical cardiovascular emergency will require a fast and appropriate response with oxygenation, and volume management. There is a great danger of hyper-oxygenation and free radicals. Find out how to prevent the formation of free radicals while maintaining effective oxygenation and ventilation for your patient.

Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13004 for 4 contact hours.

Instructor led Trauma Course for Thoracic Trauma and Shock Emergencies

CODE TRAUMA - Respiratory Emergencies

HOME COURSE ONLY
20 CE:
$38
CALL TO ORDER!

Course Objectives

Upon completion of airway management, artificial ventilation, and oxygenation course the learner will be able to:

  • Distinguish between terms
  • Respiration
  • Ventilation
  • Pulmonary ventilation
  • External respiration
  • Internal respiration
  • Cellular ventilation
  • Relate the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system to ventilation and respiration.
  • Recognize signs of mild to moderate and severe hypoxia.
  • Explain differences between adults and children and signs of hypoxia.
  • Describe the relationship between airway status and mental status.
  • Give examples of conditions that can lead to impaired ventilation and respiration.
  • Describe how partial or complete obstruction of the airway leads to hypoxia. Describe the difference between adults and children in the anatomy and the physiology of the respiratory system.
  • Explain the causes of each of the following abnormal airway’s sounds:
  • Snoring
  • Crowing
  • Gurgling
  • Strider
  • Demonstrate each of the following procedures necessary for airway assessment and correction:
  • Opening the mouth of an unresponsive patient
  • Suctioning the mouth
  • Head tilt, chin lift maneuver
  • Jaw thrust maneuver
  • Insertion of an oropharyngeal airway
  • Insertion of a nasopharyngeal airway
  • Positioning a patient for control of the airway
  • Describe the performance requirements for fixed suction devices.
  • Compare the use of rigid and soft suction catheters
  • Explain special considerations to be kept in mind when suctioning patients, including signs of hypoxia with patients with copious amounts of vomit but that cannot be quickly sectioned.
  • Describe the indications, advantages, disadvantages, precautions, uses, and limitations of the oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airways.
  • Distinguish between patients with adequate and inadequate breathing by considering the following:
  • Minute ventilation
  • Alveolar ventilation
  • Inspection of the chest
  • Patient’s general appearance
  • Regularity of breathing
  • Flaring of the nostrils
  • Patient’s ability to speak
  • Airflow
  • Breathing sounds
  • Identify patients with indications of supplemental oxygen and positive pressure ventilation.
  • Describe the physiological differences between spontaneous and positive pressure ventilation.
  • Distinguish between adequate and inadequate positive pressure ventilation.
  • Demonstrate each of the following procedures for artificial ventilation:
  • Mouth-two-mouth and mouth-two-mask ventilation
  • Delivery of positive pressure ventilation with a bag-valve-mass device (one person and two-person), with a flow restricted, oxygen-powered ventilation device, and with an automatic transport ventilator.
  • Differentiate between the duration and volume of ventilations for patients with and without pulses.
  • Explain the significance of avoiding gastric inflation when administering positive pressure ventilation.
  • Describe indications and methods of administering positive pressure ventilation’s to a patient who is breathing spontaneously.
  • Discuss the indications, contraindications, methods for administering continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or Bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP).
  • Discuss the hazards of over ventilation.
  • Discuss special considerations of airway management and ventilation for the following:
  • Patients with storm was or tracheostomy tubes
  • Infants and children
  • Patients with facial injuries
  • Patients with foreign body airway obstructions
  • Patients with dental appliances
  • Describe the properties of oxygen.
  • Differentiate between the various sizes of oxygen cylinders available.
  • Describe the hazards associated with oxygen use and safety precautions to be observed when using oxygen or handling oxygen cylinders.
  • Describe the regulation of oxygen pressures, including the uses of high-pressure and therapy regulators.
  • Discuss the use of oxygen humidifiers.
  • Discuss the administration of oxygen by the following
  • Nonrebreather mask
  • Nasal cannula
  • Simple mask
  • Partial rebreather mask
  • Venturi mask
  • Tracheostomy mask

The systematic and standardized approach to care of the patient with airway management and respiratory emergencies.

Without an open and clear airway, adequate ventilation, or sufficient oxygenation, all other emergent care is futile since the patient will rapidly deteriorate and die. Therefore, these components are part of the primary assessment that is conducted on every patient regardless of the injuries or illness.

By understanding the mechanical and physiological process of respiration and ventilation and various ways to assist patients with artificial ventilation, you will be able to quickly initiate and maintain an adequate airway and oxygenation in cases of emergency.

Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13004 for 4 contact hours.

Instructor led Trauma Course for Head and Spine Trauma and Shock Emergencies

CODE TRAUMA - Head and Spine Trauma

HOME COURSE ONLY
20 CE:
$38
CALL TO ORDER!

Course Objectives

The systematic and standardized approach to care of the patient with airway management and respiratory emergencies.

Without an open and clear airway, adequate ventilation, or sufficient oxygenation, all other emergent care is futile since the patient will rapidly deteriorate and die. Therefore, these components are part of the primary assessment that is conducted on every patient regardless of the injuries or illness.

By understanding the mechanical and physiological process of respiration and ventilation and various ways to assist patients with artificial ventilation, you will be able to quickly initiate and maintain an adequate airway and oxygenation in cases of emergency.

Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13004 for 4 contact hours.

Instructor led Trauma Course for Head and Spine Trauma and Shock Emergencies

CODE TRAUMA - Thoracic Trauma and Shock

HOME COURSE ONLY
20 CE:
$38
CALL TO ORDER!

Course Objectives

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of Code Trauma or shock and thoracic trauma, the learner will be able to:

  • Identify the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system.
  • Identify the anatomy and physiology of the heart and thoracic vessels
  • Identify the anatomy and physiology of the neck.
  • Define the mechanism of injury of blunt and penetrating injuries to the myocardium.
  • Identify conquering entries of thoracic injuries that are life-threatening.
  • Identify entries to the underlying organs of rehab and sternal fractures
  • Identify penetrating injuries to the chest wall and lacerated lung tissue.
  • Identify penetrating injuries to the heart and great vessels.
  • Identify adventitious lung sounds.
  • Identify tracheobronchial penetrating injuries.
  • Identify signs and symptoms of tracheobronchial injury.
  • Identify injuries to the neck.
  • Identify the signs, symptoms and interventions of neck trauma.
  • Identify injuries of ribs and external fractures.
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions of rib fractures.
  • Identify a flail chest
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions of flail chest.
  • Define a simple pneumothorax.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions of a simple pneumothorax.
  • Define an open pneumothorax.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions of an open pneumothorax.
  • Define a tension pneumothorax.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions for a tension pneumothorax.
  • Define a hemothorax.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions for a hemothorax.
  • Describe how to set up a chest drainage system.
  • Describe how to manage and troubleshoot a chest tube.
  • Define a pulmonary contusion.
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions for a pulmonary contusion.
  • Define blunt cardiac injury.
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions for a blunt cardiac injury.
  • Define cardiac tamponade.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions for a cardiac tamponade.
  • Define aortic disruption.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions for an aortic disruption.
  • Define a ruptured diaphragm.
  • Identify signs, symptoms and interventions for a ruptured diaphragm.
  • Demonstrate a complete head to toe assessment.
  • Identify abnormal heart sounds.
  • Define shock.
  • Define aerobic/anaerobic metabolism.
  • Define hypovolemic shock.
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions for hypovolemic shock.
  • Define obstructive shock.
  • Define cardiogenic shock
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions for cardiogenic shock
  • Identifies signs, symptoms, and interventions for obstructive shock.
  • Define distributive shock.
  • Identify signs, symptoms, and interventions for distributive shock.
  • Define cardiac output and how it relates to heart rate in stroke volume.
  • Identify the risk of unrecognized, untreated, or prolonged shock.
  • Define the adrenal gland response to shock
  • Define the immune system response to shock
  • Define the pulmonary response to shock
  • Define the cerebral response to shock
  • Define the renal response to shock
  • Define the coagulopathy response to shock
  • State and describe the three stages of shock.
  • Describe compensated shock
  • Define decompensated shock
  • Define irreversible shock
  • State the signs and interventions of hemorrhage
  • Discuss the preparation and triage for a patient with hemorrhage
  • Demonstrate a head to toe assessment with a patient in shock
  • State the diagnostics needed for a patient in shock

The systematic and standarDized approach to care of the patient that has had a head, or spine injury, and for the patient during, and after a seizure.

Injuries to the head pose some of the most serious situations you will face as an EMT or an Emergency Room Nurse.

  • The patient is often confused or unresponsive, making assessment of his condition difficult.
  • Drug and alcohol use will also cloud the assessment and make head injury diagnosis difficult.
  • Head injuries to a patient can occur days or weeks before the onset of any signs and symptoms.
  • In addition, many injuries to the head are life-threatening.
  • Such injuries are, in fact, a leading cause of death among this nation’s young people. Many patients who survive head injuries suffer permanent disability.
  • The cost of failing to recognize or properly treat such injuries can be very high.
  • Head injuries must be looked at with concern because the skull encases the structures of the central nervous system.
  • The central nervous system, made up of the brain and spinal cord, coordinates the functions of other body systems.
  • Injury the brain can have severe consequences.

Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13004 for 4 contact hours.

Jane Carsrud Director Maternal Child Program ies Nurses Educational Opportunities

Instructors:

Jane Carsrud, RN, has 35 years of experience in the nursing fields of adult care, pediatric care, emergency room, clinic, NICU and postpartum. She has been teaching “what she used to do” for the past 15 years in her business, Nurses Educational Opportunities. She provides AHA and AAP courses to nurses, physicians, CNAs, LVNs, EMTs, caregivers, and respiratory therapists.

She is BRN approved to issue continuing education units. Jane has written 15+ continuing education books. Her greater asset is her ability to teach difficult concepts and often with humor. She is well liked by all and always looks forward to teaching her classes.

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